Schopenhauer’s sense of self

Can our core subjectivity survive bodily death?

Few things matter more to the value and quality of human life than our conception of self, our notion of who or what we are. For what we identify ourselves with largely determines what we perceive as threats, what goals we believe are worth pursuing, our understanding of death, and even our sense of meaning.

For instance, those who identify themselves with their professional careers—as in “hi, I am a doctor”—stand to experience losing their job as an amputation of the self. For those who identify with their body—the mainstream conception of self in our society—life becomes a slow march towards inexorable oblivion. Most importantly, for those who see themselves as just audience to the seemingly absurd spectacle we call life, little can make sense at all.

An extraordinarily insightful analysis of the self—which, if fully grasped, can permanently free us from the horrific expectation of

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Robert James 2 18 August 2021

It will be interesting to see if your book provides an unassailable logical argument, as really that is what is needed if there is to be no trace of mysticism and so no room for self-delusion. [url=http://www.kitchenremodeltacomawa.com]www.kitchenremodeltacomawa.com

Robert James 2 2 August 2021

For those who see themselves as just audience to the seemingly absurd spectacle we call life, little can make sense at all.

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Joe Anderson 15 July 2021

This is an <a href="https://www.columbusdrywallpros.com">excellent</a> collection of original articles with a very specific focus, does it require human beings to be made up of two separate entities, one of which is left behind at death. this question form to my mind after reading this.

Zorida Oyena 8 July 2021

He had unique perspectives. Grease trap pumping Houston

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Parmenideum 23 February 2020

This brought to mind David Chalmers' idea of naturalistic dualism. Consciousness / experience is part of the "ontological furniture" of the universe, as he puts it, just like mass and charge. On this view things don't evolve consciousness, they simply partake of it on an increasing scale from electrons up. The complexity of a being would then conceivably determine just how much experiential quality it has, to the point where it might have enough to become self-aware. After which, each complex being can have individualised experience, or a "particular set of experiential content" as you write, thereby creating the idiosyncratic self on top of the claimed core self. Chalmers' idea, a form of panpsychism that traces back at least to Leibniz’s monadology is appealing, as is Schopenhauer’s dual-self take on it. Though whether either can be defended on just logical grounds seems very questionable. It will be interesting to see if your book provides an unassailable logical argument, as really that is what is needed if there is to be no trace of mysticism and so no room for self-delusion. Though at the end of the day, delusion may not be such a terrible thing if it is only to do with something as benign as a content-less universal mind, as opposed to gods with serious personality disorders.