Cold War II

Why America cannot treat China like the USSR

Two decades after the fall of the USSR, there is a new Eastern, Communist challenge to American world dominance. The parallels are obvious but China is not the USSR and Washington cannot revert to Cold War thinking. Proxy wars and military threats will not work with China, especially now America is no longer at the top, writes Sourbah Gupta.

 

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Rae Karts 29 July 2021

Doesn't US owe China on some aspect? Not being pro or anti China though.

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aanthony peters 3 June 2021

Kennan never intended his “prudent Realism” analysis to serve as the policy foundation for the Cold War (motivating American militant “Containment” and the Soviet’s counter with oppressive “Spread of Communism”) but so it was. And it almost ended up with the final solution for humanity (during the Cuban Missile Crisis and other nuclear confrontations).

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Minnnie 21 May 2021

Very interesting read. This was the first time I had thought about the similarities and differences between these two bi-polar moments in international relations. Is there much about this out there? I wonder how rigid the foreign policy 'blob' in Washington really is? If they are stuck in Cold War thinking, there is going to be a lot to learn over the next 50 years. Fascinating stuff.